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Case Report Prize - Trainee

Current Application Deadline: 9 September 2022 23:59

About the Prize

The applicant must submit a case report and review of the literature of a standard suitable for publication that goes beyond basic morphological and immunohistochemical diagnostics, including molecular and other ancillary diagnostic tests to give a significant learning opportunity to medical students, pathology trainees and some pathology consultants.

Prize: £100 and the opportunity to present the case as an oral presentation at the next Joint Summer Meeting with the BDIAP, for which the winner is offered free registration.

Who is eligible?

Trainee Society Members.

Deadline Date

1 March

Please read the full terms and conditions before applying

Scoring criteria

Understanding, novelty, use of ancillary tests, images, appropriate depth of information, style, clarity, follows instructions.

Case reports already accepted for publication on the closing date of the competition are not eligible.

Apply for this grant

Case Report Prize Winners

2020

Trainee - Dr Mohammed Nimir, Coventry: Cutaneous Angiosarcoma - A Significantly Short Duration from Presentation to Terminal Illness

Undergraduate - Ms Maiar Elghobashy, Birmingham - Unusual Presentation of Mammary Calciphylaxis in a Patient on Longstanding Renal Dialysis

2019

Trainee - Dr Philip Macklin, Oxford: A Complex Case of a Mediastinal Mass in a 32-year-old Female

2017

Trainee - Dr Gemma Petts, Manchester: The Importance of Integrated Molecular and Histopathological Assessment in Dystrophinopathies

Undergraduate - Christian Slater, Manchester: Congenital Neuroblastoma - When it Doesn't All Add Up

2016

Trainee - Dr Richard Colling, Oxford: The Role of Clonality Studies in Diagnostic Molecular Haematopathology

Undergraduate - Roshni C Mansfield, Oxford: A First for Oxford Neuropathology

2015

Trainee - Dr Isabel Woodman, Kent: Two Cases of EBV Lymphoproliferative Lesions in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Undergraduate - Katie Milne, Oxford: A Cautionary Tale of Clonality